Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Knee Swelling Of Or Pain In

For ordinary slight injuries, complete rest, and rubbing with ...

Styptic Charms

Fancy can save or kill; it hath closed up wounds, when t...

Vitamins For Young Persons And Children

Young healthy people from weaning through their thirties shou...

Breathing Correct Method Of

The capacity of an ordinary pair of lungs is about 250 cubic i...

Punctures Case Vii

Mr. Parr, aged 30, of delicate habit, trod upon a needle whic...

Scarlatina Anginosa Or Sore-throat Scarlet-fever

Wherever the _throat_ is affected, which is almost always the...

Symptoms

Malignant disease of the esophagus is rarely seen early, bec...

Polarization Of The Circuit

I have said, in effect, a little above, that, while the curre...

Felon - Whitlow

For this disease, in the early stage, when the sensation is t...

Wounds Soothing

During the process of healing, wounds often give a great deal ...

Treatment Of Other Eruptive Fevers

The treatment as prescribed for scarlatina in this pamphlet, ...

Before Perspiration Comes On There Is A Little More Excitement For

a few minutes (41), which must not induce the friends of the pa...

One's Self

TO be truly at peace with one's self means rest indeed. Th...

Decline

See Consumption. ...

Torpid Reaction Asthenic

The more violent the contagious poison, and the weaker the or...

Stokes Adams Disease Heart Block

Stokes-Adams disease, or the Stokes-Adams syndrome, is a name...

Chloroform

See Child-bearing. ...

Errors To Avoid In Suspected Foreign Body Cases

1. Do not reach for the foreign body with the fingers, lest...

Clothing

Clothes should be Loose and Comfortable. Man is the only anim...

Chloroform Or Ether (swallowed)

Emetic; enema of hot coffee; keep awake. If necessary, artific...



Adherent Pericarditis





Category: Uncategorized
Source: Disturbances Of The Heart

Following dry pericarditis or pericarditis with an exudate,
especially when the exudate is fibrinous in character, the fibrous
substance which is not absorbed or resorbed may develop into
connective tissue, and the two pericardial surfaces become
permanently grown together, causing the so-called adherent
pericarditis. These adhesions between the two surfaces of the
pericardium may be general throughout the entire pericardial sac, or
they may be limited to some one or more parts of the pericardium.
Perhaps one of the most frequent points of adhesion is the anterior
part of the pericardium, while the apex is the part most likely to
be free, even when other parts of the pericardium have grown
together. This freedom of the apex is probably due to the constant
and more extensive motion of the apical portion of the heart, and is
the reason that it has been suggested, as referred to under acute
pericarditis, that, other conditions not contraindicating, the
patient may be allowed to move about a little during convalescence
to cause the heart to beat more actively. Sometimes the surfaces of
the pericardium are not closely adherent to each other, but bands of
adhesion stretch from one surface to the other.

After adhesions have taken place between the two layers of the
pericardium, the action of the heart is impaired, serious
interference with the cardiac action may develop, and sudden death
may occur. If the heart is given all the rest possible during the
acute phase of the disease, there will be less likelihood of the
surfaces becoming so irritated that adhesions readily form. Anything
which permits complete absorption and resorption of tile exudate
will tend to prevent these hampering adhesions. If the adhesions are
such as to cause irregular heart, recurrent pain and the danger of
sudden death, surgical help has been suggested. This surgical
procedure is to remove a portion of the ribs, perhaps of the third,
fourth and fifth, to allow the heart more freedom of action to
compensate for the impairment of its activity from the adhesions.
Such an operation was first suggested by Brauer of Heidelberg in
1902.

The question of the best method of producing anesthesia in this
condition of the heart is a serious one. A patient might die during
the anesthesia; but he might also die at any time from cardiac
spasm. In certain instances, in adults, local anesthesia might be
sufficient. Pain reflexes, however, would be serious. Such an
operation would be indicated when the apex is fixed so that there is
a constant sensation of hugging of the heart at the fourth and fifth
ribs, with paroxysms of pain and cardiac weakness.





Next: Myocardial Disturbances

Previous: Pericarditis Symptoms And Signs



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 2089