VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.homemedicine.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Nursing Over

Few vital processes are more remarkable than that by which foo...

Tumours

A large, soft, fleshy tumour is usually simply an accumulation...

Mammary Abscess

(_Ague in the breast--Inflamed breast_.) This is a disease...

Ulcers Case Xxxi

Mr. S. aged 30, had a sore two inches in length in the groin,...

Breath And Blood

Often difficulty of breathing, especially in close air, mistak...

Piles - Hemorrhoids

One important matter in all cases of habitual piles, is, to k...

Fever Rheumatic

This results from severe damp chills, usually following exhaus...

Squeezing

See Rubbing. ...

Ipecac

acts very beneficially when applied to the surface where ther...

Diseases And Disturbances Of The Skin

Their Chief Causes. Skin troubles are of two main kinds accor...

Impossibility Of Answering For The Issue Of Every Typhoid Case

Although a _typhoid character_ of scarlatina will rarely set ...

Technic Of Laryngeal Operations

Preparation of the patient and anesthesia have been mentione...

Memory Loss Of

A more or less complete suspension of this faculty is a not un...

Plain Every-day Common Sense

PLAIN common sense! When we come to sift everything d...

Inflammation Of The Bowels

See Bowels. ...

The Surgical Dissection Of The Axillary And Brachial Regions Displaying The Relative Order Of Their Contained Parts

All surgical regions have only artificial boundaries; and the...

Other Lesions

Tricuspid insufficiency, except as rarely found in the fetus,...

Eczema

Skin eruptions, known under this name, have very various cause...

Beef Tea

It is well to bear in mind that there is scarcely any nourishm...

Acute Esophagitis

This is usually of traumatic or cauterant origin. If severe o...



Adherent Pericarditis





Category: Uncategorized
Source: Disturbances Of The Heart

Following dry pericarditis or pericarditis with an exudate,
especially when the exudate is fibrinous in character, the fibrous
substance which is not absorbed or resorbed may develop into
connective tissue, and the two pericardial surfaces become
permanently grown together, causing the so-called adherent
pericarditis. These adhesions between the two surfaces of the
pericardium may be general throughout the entire pericardial sac, or
they may be limited to some one or more parts of the pericardium.
Perhaps one of the most frequent points of adhesion is the anterior
part of the pericardium, while the apex is the part most likely to
be free, even when other parts of the pericardium have grown
together. This freedom of the apex is probably due to the constant
and more extensive motion of the apical portion of the heart, and is
the reason that it has been suggested, as referred to under acute
pericarditis, that, other conditions not contraindicating, the
patient may be allowed to move about a little during convalescence
to cause the heart to beat more actively. Sometimes the surfaces of
the pericardium are not closely adherent to each other, but bands of
adhesion stretch from one surface to the other.

After adhesions have taken place between the two layers of the
pericardium, the action of the heart is impaired, serious
interference with the cardiac action may develop, and sudden death
may occur. If the heart is given all the rest possible during the
acute phase of the disease, there will be less likelihood of the
surfaces becoming so irritated that adhesions readily form. Anything
which permits complete absorption and resorption of tile exudate
will tend to prevent these hampering adhesions. If the adhesions are
such as to cause irregular heart, recurrent pain and the danger of
sudden death, surgical help has been suggested. This surgical
procedure is to remove a portion of the ribs, perhaps of the third,
fourth and fifth, to allow the heart more freedom of action to
compensate for the impairment of its activity from the adhesions.
Such an operation was first suggested by Brauer of Heidelberg in
1902.

The question of the best method of producing anesthesia in this
condition of the heart is a serious one. A patient might die during
the anesthesia; but he might also die at any time from cardiac
spasm. In certain instances, in adults, local anesthesia might be
sufficient. Pain reflexes, however, would be serious. Such an
operation would be indicated when the apex is fixed so that there is
a constant sensation of hugging of the heart at the fourth and fifth
ribs, with paroxysms of pain and cardiac weakness.





Next: Myocardial Disturbances

Previous: Pericarditis Symptoms And Signs



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1174