The names given to the various lines of a tooth on a gear-wheel are as follows: In Figure 233, A is the face and B the flank of a tooth, while C is the point, and D the root of the tooth; E is the height or depth, and F the breadth. P P is the ... Read more of Drawing Gear Wheels at How to Draw.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Nervous Attacks

What we call, for want of a better name, "nerve force," or "ne...

Heat And Weakness

We have over and over again shown in these papers how heat pas...

Ankylosis

Fixation of the crico-arytenoid joints with an approximation...

Flannel Bands

See Band, Flannel. ...

Direct Laryngoscopy In Diseases Of The Larynx

The diagnosis of laryngeal disease in young children, impossi...

Endocarditis A Secondary Affection

Mild endocarditis is rarely a primary affection, and is almos...

Flatulence

This is the accumulation of gases in the body, usually caused ...

Biscuits And Water

The biscuits referred to are manufactured in Saltcoats.[A] The...

Erysipelas

This troublesome disease is also known as St. Anthony's Fire, ...

Rules For Endoscopic Foreign Body Extraction

1. Never endoscope a foreign body case unprepared, with the...

Tempering Treatment

Much, if not all, of the success in any case of treatment depe...

Treatment

It is a mistake to try to force a foreign body into the stom...

Palpitation

Ordinarily we are not aware of the beating of the heart, enorm...

Irritable Bowels

Some peoples' lives don't run smoothly. Jeanne's certainly di...

Flushings Hot

These are often a really serious trouble, especially to women,...

Polypus

See Nostrils. ...

Diagnosis

It has been estimated that 70 per cent of stenoses of the es...

Nervous Strain In The Emotions

THE most intense suffering which follows a misuse of ...

Indications For Strychnin

Strychnin is a much overused drug. It is now given for almost...

Wounds Bleeding Of

After sending for a surgeon the first thing to be looked at in...



Agrippa






Source: Primitive Psycho-therapy And Quackery

HEINRICH CORNELIUS AGRIPPA VON NETTESHEIM, a German alchemist,
philosopher, and cabalist, of noble ancestry, was born at Cologne, on
the Rhine, September 14, 1486. Having received a liberal education and
being by nature versatile, he became in his youth a secretary at the
Court of the German Emperor, Maximilian I.

He served moreover in the army under that monarch, during several
Italian campaigns, and by reason of gallantry, won the spurs of a
knight. Becoming averse to the profession of arms, he studied with
avidity law, medicine, philosophy, and languages, and in 1509 became
Professor of Hebrew at Dole, in the department of Jura, France. Here his
caustic humor and intemperate language involved him in quarrels with the
monks, while his restless disposition impelled him to rove in search of
adventure. He visited successively London, Pavia, and Metz, where he
became a magistrate and town orator.

Having expressed opinions contrary to the prevalent beliefs in regard to
saints and witches, he was forced to depart abruptly. We next hear of
him as a practising physician in Fribourg, Switzerland. Thereafter he
became a vagabond and almost a beggar. Like his contemporary,
Paracelsus, he advanced the most paradoxical theories during his
adventurous career, which latter was partly scientific and partly
political, but always turbulent. Finally he established himself at
Lyons, where he again practised medicine, and became physician to Louise
of Savoy, Regent of France, and the mother of Francis I. Here Agrippa
soon fell into disgrace and was banished. In 1528 he joined the Court
of Margaret of Austria, ruler of the Netherlands, at Antwerp. On the
publication of his work, "On the Vanity of the Sciences," he was
imprisoned for a year at Brussels.

Upon his release, he returned to Lyons, where he was again detained in
custody, on account of an old libel against his former patroness.

His death occurred at Grenoble, France, February 18, 1535.

Agrippa was possessed of great versatility and learning, but his
writings are tinctured with bitterness and satire. He has been described
as restless, ambitious, enthusiastic, and credulous, a dupe himself and
a deceiver of others. His career was a continuous series of
disappointments and quarrels.

Yet he was an earnest searcher after truth, who was fain to attempt the
unlocking of Nature's secrets, but did not hold the right key.
Profoundly superstitious, he taught, for example, that the herb,
Verbena officinalis, vervain, would cure tertian or quartan fevers
according to the manner in which it was divided or cut. Agrippa has been
tersely described as a "meteor of philosophy."





Next: Cardan

Previous: Paracelsus



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 807