A wound may be defined as a 'breach of continuity in the structures of the body, whether external or internal, suddenly occasioned by mechanical violence.' The law does not define 'a wound,' but the true skin must be broken. Wounds are danger... Read more of Wounds And Mechanical Injuries at Forensic Medicine.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Bruises Case Xv





Category: ON THE APPLICATION OF THESE MODES OF TREATMENT TO PARTICULAR CASES.
Source: Application Of The Lunar Caustic In The Cure Of Certain Wounds And Ulcers

The following case was far more severe, but the mode of treatment was
not less efficacious.

Mr. Granger, aged 36, was exposed to a severe bruise by a great weight
of stones which had been piled up, falling upon the outside of the
leg; he was extricated from this situation with much difficulty.
Besides the bruise, the skin was removed from the outside of the leg
to the extent of ten or twelve inches in length, and in some parts an
inch and half in breadth; and in the forepart of the ankle a deep
furrow was made by the rough edge of one of the stones. I applied the
caustic in about half an hour after the accident, over the whole
surface of the wounds, and protected the eschar by the gold-beater's
skin. The patient was directed to keep the leg cool and exposed to the
air. He took no medicine.

On the succeeding day the leg was a little swelled, but the patient
did not complain of any acute pain but only of a sense of stiffness.
An adherent and perfect eschar was found to be formed over the whole
extent of the wound. There was no fever.

On the third day, the swelling had abated. No further remedy. The
patient was still enjoined to rest.

On the fourth day the swelling was nearly gone. The eschar remained
adherent. The patient walks about.

From this time the patient pursued his avocation of a stone-mason; no
further remedy was required; no inconvenience experienced; and the
eschar separated in about a month.

I think it totally impossible to have cured this wound, by any other
remedy, in less than a month; during which period the patient must
have suffered much pain and fever, and have been quite confined.

It is also quite certain, I think, that there would have been an
extensive slough, from the severity of the bruise. This was doubtless
prevented by the application of the caustic.





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