VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.homemedicine.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Croup

Treat croup, whether membranous or spasmodic, much the same a...

Rules For Endoscopic Foreign Body Extraction

1. Never endoscope a foreign body case unprepared, with the...

Scarlatina Anginosa Or Sore-throat Scarlet-fever

Wherever the _throat_ is affected, which is almost always the...

To Prevent Typhoid Fever

When exposed, as in nursing the sick, take _Baptisia_ 2d, and...

Burns And Scalds

No matter what the nature and extent of the burn may be, the ...

Heat Internal

There is a usual (normal) temperature in all the blood and tis...

Shampooing

See Head, Soaping. ...

Bone Soft

Often, in the young, the bones are so soft that they bend more...

Infants' Sleep

See Children's Sleep. ...

Intestinal Putrefaction

The most successful procedure in the management of intestinal...

Imaginary Vacations

ONCE a young woman who had very hard work to do day a...

Brain Impressions

THE mere idea of a brain clear from false impressions gives a...

Papillomata Of The Larynx In Children

Of all benign growths in the larynx papilloma is the most fre...

Diet For Middle Age And The Aged

In advancing years when less exercise is, as a rule, taken, a ...

Painful Menstruation

Elsie was twenty. She came to see me because I had helped Els...

Bilious Colic

This disease, in addition to the symptoms of cutting, crampin...

Hoarseness

This arises generally, from inflammation of the mucous membra...

Technic Of Specular Esophagoscopy

Recumbent patient. Boyce position. The larynx is to be expos...

Decompensation

To understand the physiology, pathology and the best treatmen...

Nightmare

In serious cases of this trouble, the patient awakes some time...



Diphtheria





Category: CHRONIC STENOSIS OF THE LARYNX AND TRACHEA
Source: A Manual Of Peroral Endoscopy And Laryngeal Surgery

Chronic postdiphtheritic stenosis may be of the panic,
spasmodic or, rarely, the paralytic types; but more often it is of
either the hypertrophic or cicatricial forms. Only too frequently the
stenosis should be called posttracheotomic rather than
postdiphtheritic, since decannulation after the subsidence of the
acute stenosis would have been easy had it not been for the sequelae
of the faulty tracheotomy. Prolonged intubation may induce either a
supraglottic or subglottic tissue hyperplasia. The supraglottic type
consists in an edematous thickening around the base of the epiglottis,
sometimes involving also the glossoepiglottic folds and the
ventricular bands. An improperly shaped or fitted tube is the usual
cause of this condition, and a change to a correct form of intubation
tube may be all that is required. Excessive polypoid tissue
hypertrophy should be excised. The less redundant cases subside under
galvanocaustic treatment, which may be preceded by tracheotomy and
extubation, or the intubation tube may be replaced after the
application of the cautery. The former method is preferable since the
patient is far safer with a tracheotomic cannula and, further, the
constant irritation of the intubation tube is avoided. Subglottic
hypertrophic stenosis consists in symmetrical turbinal-like swellings
encroaching on the lumen from either side. Cautious galvanocauterant
treatment accurately applied by the direct method will practically
always cure this condition. Preliminary tracheotomy is required in
those cases in which it has not already been done, and in the cases in
which a high tracheotomy has been done, a low tracheotomy must be the
first step in the cure. Cicatricial types of postdiphtheritic stenosis
may be seen as webs, annular cicatrices of funnel shape, or masses of
fibrous tissue causing fixation of the arytenoids as well as
encroachment on the glottic lumen. (See color plates.)

As a rule, when a convalescent diphtheritic patient cannot be
extubated two weeks after three negative cultures have been obtained
the advisability of a low tracheotomy should be considered. If a
convalescent intubated patient cough up a tube and become dyspneic a
low tracheotomy is usually preferable to forcing in an oversized
intubation tube.





Next: Typhoid Fever

Previous: Lues



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 2257