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The Journey Down The Food Tube

The Flow of Saliva and Appetite Juice. We are now ready to st...

Mushrooms

Emetic; castor oil and enema. ...

Intestinal Putrefaction

The most successful procedure in the management of intestinal...

Ipecac

acts very beneficially when applied to the surface where ther...

Benign Neoplasms Of The Esophagus

As a result of prolonged inflammation edematous polypi and gr...

The Ammonium Carbonicum

recommended by Peart, has been considered by many as a specif...

The Nose

How the Nose is Made. The nose began as a pair of little puck...

Exercise

Where this is advised medically, it is often taken in a manner...

Acetic Acid

For use in our treatment we recommend Coutts' Acetic Acid. It ...

Poisoning Blood

Where this arises from a more or less putrid wound, what is ai...

Epidemics

The key to action in case of epidemics prevailing in the distr...

Punctures Case I

A.B. received a severe punctured wound by a hook of the size ...

Bathing

Cold baths, while greatly to be recommended to those who are s...

Spine Misshapen

Often in the case of delicate infants or children, the bones o...

Vitamin Program For The Sick

No matter which way you look at it or how well insured you ma...

Imaginary Vacations

ONCE a young woman who had very hard work to do day a...

Scald Head

of children, where there is a discharge of yellow and watery ...

Hiccup

Though often but slight, disappearing in a few minutes by some ...

Introduction Of The Esophagoscope

The esophagoscope is to be passed only with ocular guidance, ...

Chronic Esophagitis

This is usually a result of stagnation of food or secretion, ...



Fever Intermitting






Source: Papers On Health

For this the treatment may be given as in gastric
fever, and, in addition, the stomach and bowels should be carefully
lathered over with soap lather (see Lather). This has a wonderfully
soothing effect. It may be spread with the hand over the skin, and
fresh supplies gently rubbed on until much of the fever is removed.
Some five minutes' lathering at a time is enough--this may be done
several times a-day. Carefully dry after it, and let the patient rest.

It will be well to anticipate such attacks by softening the skin when
it shows a tendency to be hard and dry. A gentle rubbing now and again
with fine lather and good olive oil will secure this. We say lather and
oil because, when there is no fever heat, lather by itself is too
cooling, but when mixed with a little oil the mixture is comforting
rather than chilling, and softens nicely.





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