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Mechanical Effect Of Each Pole





Category: PRINCIPLES OF PRACTICE.
Source: A Newly Discovered System Of Electrical Medication

The mechanical effect of the forward end of the current, or that part
of it which is under the negative electrode, is to relax, expand and
weaken; while that of the rear end, under the positive electrode, is to
contract and strengthen. A moving ship disperses the waters at its bow,
but draws them in at its stern. The bullet shot from a gun, in passing
through a plank, leaves the perforation closed where it enters in, but
wide open where it comes out. Thus, in physics, the advance end of a
moving body tends to disperse the element through which it is passing,
while the rear end tends to its contraction. Analogous to this are the
mechanical effects of the different ends of an electrical current in
the living tissue. When, therefore, we wish to relax a muscle that is
unnaturally contracted, as by rheumatism or otherwise, we must bring it
under the forward end--the outward current--the negative pole. If we
desire to contract ligaments or muscles that are abnormally relaxed,
(not atrophied), as in prolapsus uteri, we must subject them to the
rear end of the current--the positive pole. Parts that are unnaturally
contracted are electrically negative in excess, and need to be made more
positive. And parts that are unhealthily relaxed are too positive, and
should be made more negative. We make a part more positive by applying
to it the negative pole, and more negative by applying to it the
positive pole. Parts spasmodically contracted are acute and positive;
those permanently contracted are chronic and negative.





Next: Relaxed And Atrophied Conditions

Previous: The Inward And The Outward Current



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