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Nourishment Cold In






Source: Papers On Health

If a person is in fever, and is burning with
internal heat, a little bit of ice, sucked in the mouth, gives great
relief. The relief is got in this way: the melted ice, in the form of
water, is little in bulk in proportion to the heat which is absorbed in
melting it. To absorb the same heat by means of merely cold water,
would imply a great amount of water, and an inconvenient filling of the
stomach. The heat used up in melting the small bit of ice is great, and
the amount of water exceedingly small. This gives benefit without
inconvenience; hence, to suck a bit of ice is to be much preferred in
such a case to taking a drink of cold water.

Within proper limits, beyond all question, cold is, in certain cases,
essential to nourishment. For example, in a case of thirst such as we
have noticed, the heat of the stomach extending to the mouth is drying
up all the juices that should go to secure digestion and assimilation.
The saliva is dried up, and the gastric juice equally so. Cold is
applied to the pit of the stomach (not ice, but a moderate degree of
repeated cold), and the result is, these juices begin to flow.
Nourishment is the consequence, and very clearly, in such a case, it is
the consequence of cold. In other words, it is the result of reducing
the excessive internal heat, and leaving something like the proper
degree behind.

The place which cold has in nourishing is, so to speak, negative--that
is, it is useful only in reducing overheating. But when we remember how
a frosty morning sharpens appetites and makes the cheeks glow with
ruddy health, we see that such reduction of overheat is not
infrequently required.





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