Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Eyes Inflamed

For all kinds of burning inflammatory pain in the eyes, the fo...

Rheumatic Fever

See Fever, Rheumatic. ...

Spasmodic Stenosis Of The Esophagus

Etiology - The functional activity of the esophagus is depend...

Punctures Case V

Mr. Cocking's son, aged 12, received a stab in the palm of th...

Blood Pressure

The study of the blood pressure has become a subject of gre...

Barley

If this grain is well grown and thoroughly well cooked, it wil...

The Relative Anatomy Of The Male Pelvic Organs

As the abdomen and pelvis form one general cavity, the organs...

Stomach Ulcers

Generally the tongue will tell whether the stomach is ulcerate...

Stage 2

Passing the cricopharyngeus is the most difficult part of es...

The Organic Versus Chemical Feud

Now, regrettably, and at great personal risk to my reputation...

Cornus Sericea

will often cure malignant ulcers both of the breast and uteru...

Malignant Disease Of The Esophagus

Cancer of the esophagus is a more prevalent disease than is c...

Acquiring Skill

Endoscopic ability cannot be bought with the instruments. As ...

Endoscopy On The Human Being

Dog work offers but little practice in laryngoscopy. Because...

Amenorrhea Suppressed Menstruation

Treat as for chlorosis. But if the case be recent--the effect...

The Relation Of The Internal Parts To The External Surface Of The Body

An exact acquaintance with the normal character of the extern...

Water On The Chest

Sometimes a large watery swelling appears in one part or anoth...

Treatment Of Other Eruptive Fevers

The treatment as prescribed for scarlatina in this pamphlet, ...

Forceps

Delicacy of touch and manipulation are an absolute necessity...

Brain Impressions

THE mere idea of a brain clear from false impressions gives a...



Pathologic Physiology





Category: Uncategorized
Source: Disturbances Of The Heart

The development of permanent injury to one or more valves of the
heart may have been watched by the physician who cares for a patient
with acute endocarditis, or it may have been noted early during the
progress of arteriosclerosis or other conditions of hypertension. On
the other hand, many instances of valvular lesions may be found
during a life-insurance examination, or are discovered by the
physician making a general physical examination for an indefinable
general disturbance or for local symptoms. without the patient ever
having known that he had a damaged heart. The previous history of
such a patient will generally disclose the pathologic cause or the
physical excuse.

As soon as a valve has become injured the heart muscle hypertrophies
to force the blood through a narrowed orifice or to evacuate the
blood coming into a compartment of the heart from two directions
instead of one, as occurs in regurgitation or insufficiency of a
valve. The heart muscle becomes hypertrophied, like any other muscle
which is compelled to do extra work. Which part or parts of the
heart will become most enlarged depends on the particular valvular
lesion. In some instances this enlargement is enormous, increasing a
heart which normally weighs from 10 to 12 ounces to a weight of 20
or even 25 ounces, and extreme weights of from 40 to 50 ounces and
even more are recorded.

As long as the heart remains in this hypertrophied condition, which
may be called normal hypertrophy since it is needed for the work
which has to be done in overcoming the defect in the valve, there
are no symptoms, the pulmonary and systemic circulation is
sufficient, and the patient does not know that he is incapacitated.
Sooner or later, however, the nutrition of the heart, especially in
atheromatous conditions, becomes impaired, and the lack of a proper
blood supply to the heart muscle causes myocardial disturbance,
either a chronic myocarditis or fatty degeneration. If there is no
atheromatous condition of the coronary arteries, and arterial
disease is not a cause of the valvular lesion, compensation may be
broken by some sudden extra strain put on the heart, either muscular
or by some acute sickness or a necessary anesthetic and operation.
From any of these causes the muscle again becomes impaired, and the
heart, especially the part which is the weakest and has the most
work to do relatively to its strength, becomes dilated, compensation
is broken, and all of the various circulatory disturbances resulting
from an insufficient heart strength develop.





Next: Precautions To Be Observed

Previous: Etiology Treatment



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1092