Pulmonary Stenosis Pulmonary Obstruction


Categories: Uncategorized
Sources: Disturbances Of The Heart

If stenosis is actually present in this location, the lesion is

probably congenital. It might occur after a serious acute infectious

endocarditis, but then it would be associated with other lesions of

the heart. It has been found to be associated with such congenital

lesions of the heart as an open foramen ovale or foramen Botalli, or

with an imperfect ventricular septum, and perhaps with tricuspid

stenosis--in short, a cardiac congenital defect. The right ventricle

becomes hypertrophied, if the child lives to overcome the

obstruction.



The physical sign is a systolic blow at the second intercostal space

on the left; but as just stated, such a murmur must surely be

dissociated from an aortic murmur if found to develop after

babyhood, and it should also be diagnosed from the frequently

occurring hemic, basic and systolic murmurs; that is, if signs of

pulmonary lesions are not heard soon after birth or in early

babyhood, the diagnosis of pulmonary defects can be made only by

exclusion.



Unless the right ventricle is found later to be in trouble, there is

no treatment for this condition. If the right ventricle dilates,

digitalis may be of benefit.





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