From MRS. W. H. FELTON, OF GEORGIA, Lady Manager. Bread crumbs and cold rice, equal quantities; season with pepper, onion and salt to taste, mixing well with cup of butter and yolks of three hard boiled eggs; dress the outside with circles of white h... Read more of HOW TO COOK CHESTNUTS at Home Made Cookies.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Ulcers






Source: Papers On Health

An ulcer is an "eating sore": that is, a sore containing
matter which eats away the skin and flesh, thereby extending itself,
and increasing in depth as well. To stop this diseased process, the
virulent matter in the ulcer must be killed or neutralised, and this
can usually best be done by means of vinegar or weak ACETIC ACID
(see), which is most powerfully antiseptic. The only difficulty is to
avoid irritating the sore by the application of too strong acid. The
treatment by weak acid is very effective, but it must be a fairly
prolonged and thorough soaking. Apply a little at a time to the sore.
Use warm water if pain be caused. Continue the soaking for even an hour
at a time, twice or even three times a day. The wound may be dressed
with good fresh olive oil after each soaking. Usually, nothing else
will be required, but it must be thoroughly done.

In a very severe case, mix in a teacupful of hot water as much
saltpetre as the water will dissolve. Add to this a teaspoonful of
acetic acid, and use this to soak the sore instead of simple weak acid.
Then, if healing does not come, it is probably because rest is not
taken, and most likely also because there is deficient vitality in the
whole system. Let the treatment with the lotion be given in the
morning. Secure rest during the day, and in the evening, for an hour,
thoroughly foment the feet and legs up over the knees. Once a week for
two weeks give the SOAPY BLANKET (see) instead of this treatment, and
in the morning rub all over the body with hot vinegar. This powerfully
stimulates the vitality of the whole system. Even a very bad ulcer
should give way under a careful course of united acid soaking, rest,
and this stimulating treatment.





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