Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Demonstrations Of The Origin And Progress Of Femoral Hernia Its Diagnosis The Taxis And The Operation

PLATE 45, Fig. 1.--The point, 3, from which an external ingui...

The Contagion Of Scarlatina Very Active

The _contagion_ of scarlatina is very active, and adheres for...

Acidity Of The Stomach

Often caused by unwholesome food, bad or deficient teeth, or b...

Children's Strength

The question often arises as to the ability of children to bea...

Weariness

Where persistent weariness is felt, and the least exertion bri...

Physical Care

REST, fresh air, exercise, and nourishment, enough of each in...

Benign Growths In The Larynx

Benign growths in the larynx are easily and accurately remova...

Self-consciousness

SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS may be truly defined as a person's...

Quacks And Quackery

Quackery and the love of being quacked, are in human nat...

Fever Hay

See Hay Fever. ...

Worms

It is difficult to determine the presence of _worms_ in child...

Illness

AS far as we make circumstances guides and not limitations, t...

Circulation Of The Blood

Nothing is more important for the health or healing of any org...

Treatment Of Scarlatina Simplex Or Simple Scarlet-fever

_Scarlatina simplex_, or _simple scarlet-fever_ (9), without ...

Illness The Root Of

In treating any trouble it is well to get to the root of it. O...

Alcohol

This, in various forms, as brandy, whiskey, rum, wine, cordial...

Neuralgia

_Aconite_ and _Bell._ are two important remedies in this affe...

Elbow Joint

See Armpit Swelling and Bone. ...

Ulcers

An ulcer is an "eating sore": that is, a sore containing matte...

Hands Cold

Much more than is readily believed depends on the state of the...



Van Helmont






Source: Primitive Psycho-therapy And Quackery

JOHANN BAPTIST VAN HELMONT, a celebrated Belgian physician, scholar and
visionary, of noble family, was born at Brussels in 1577. At an early
age he began the study of medicine, and was appointed Professor of
Surgery at the University of Louvain. Becoming, however, infected with
the delusions of alchemy, and being possessed of an ardent imagination,
he inclined naturally to the study of occult science, and was infatuated
with the idea of discovering a universal remedy. He was, moreover, a
follower of the eminent theologian, Johann Tauler (1290-1361), founder
of mystic theology in Germany. Van Helmont has been described as an
enthusiastic and fantastic, though upright friend of the truth. He
adhered to the theosophic and alchemistic doctrines of a somewhat
earlier epoch, and was an admirer of the dogmatic pseudo-philosophy of
Paracelsus.

The German writer, Johann Christian Ferdinand Hoefer (1811-1878), said
that Van Helmont was much superior to Paracelsus, whom he took as his
model. He had the permanent distinction of revealing scientifically the
existence of invisible, impalpable substances, namely gases. And he was
the first to employ the word gas as the name of all elastic fluids
except common air. Van Helmont graduated as Doctor of Medicine in
1599, and after several years of study at different European
universities, he returned home and married Margaret van Ranst, a noble
lady of Brabant. He then settled down on his estate at Vilvoorden, near
Brussels, where he remained until his death in 1644.

Johann Hermann Baas, in his "History of Medicine," characterizes him as
a fertile genius in the department of chemistry, but denies that he was
a great and independent spirit, outrunning his age, or impressing upon
it the stamp of his own individuality. Van Helmont, like many another
irregular practitioner, achieved fame by some remarkable cures. It was
said of him that his patients never languished long under his care,
being always killed or cured within two or three days. He was frequently
called to attend those who had been given up by other physicians. And to
the latters' chagrin, such patients were often unexpectedly restored to
health.

A lover of the marvellous, and credulous to the point of superstition,
Van Helmont became infatuated with erroneous doctrines. His
contemporaries, dazzled, it may be, by the brilliancy of his mental
powers, regarded him as an erratic genius, but not as a charlatan.

The term spiritual vitalism has been applied to the philosophy of Van
Helmont. He maintained that the primary cause of all organization was
Archaeus (Gr. +archaios+, primitive), a term said to have been
invented by Basil Valentine, the German alchemist (born 1410).

This has been defined as a spirit, or invisible man or animal, of
ethereal substance, the counterpart of the visible body, within which it
resides, and to which it imparts life, strength, and the power of
assimilating food. Archaeus was regarded as the creative
spirit, which, working upon the raw material of water or fluidity, by
means of a ferment promotes the various actions which result in the
development and nutrition of the physical organism. As life and all
vital action depended upon archaeus, any disturbance of this spirit
was regarded as the probable cause of fevers and other morbid
conditions.





Next: Fludd

Previous: Greatrakes



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 787