BY E. D. TOWNSEND (ADAPTED) One day, as the general was sitting at his table in the office, the messenger announced that a person desired to see him a moment in order to present a gift. A German was introduced, who said that he was commiss... Read more of General Scott And The Stars And Stripes at Children Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Weakness






Source: Papers On Health

Often there follows, after the cure of an inflammatory
disease, very great weakness. This in itself is sometimes a great
danger, but can usually be removed by proper care and nursing. The
common method of administering wine, brandy, or other alcoholic liquor,
is the very worst that could be adopted. Hot water will prove a
valuable stimulant, when a stimulant is required. Any NOURISHMENT
(see) to be given should also be just a little warmer than blood
heat. For drink, the unfermented wine made by Frank Wright, Chemist,
Kensington, London, is of great value. It is simply the pure juice of
the grape. If milk be given, it should always be diluted with an equal
bulk of boiling water. The fomentation of the feet and legs will
greatly help in restoring vigour. This should be done gently at first,
where the weakness is great. Afterwards, when the patient can bear it,
the ARMCHAIR FOMENTATION (see) will be found serviceable. All this,
of course, is on the assumption that only weakness and no fever is
the trouble. Where fever is present, other treatment is necessary.

Sponging all over with warm vinegar is also a most invigorating thing.
Do this once, and afterwards the treatment may be varied by the real
stimulant of cayenne being used in the form of an infusion strong
enough to rouse the nerves, as is done by the acid. This has the
advantage of saving the skin, if that is tender, and keeping off
eruption, which is apt to come if the acid is often used. We think it
well to use the acid once or so, and the cayenne infusion as frequently
as anything of the kind is required. Rubbing with olive oil is also
most beneficial. But both must be done very cautiously where there is
great weakness. To rub the whole body at once will then be too much.
But it may be done bit by bit, stopping whenever fatigue or chilliness
is felt by the patient. See also Heat and Weakness.





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