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Punctures Case Iii

Source: Application Of The Lunar Caustic In The Cure Of Certain Wounds And Ulcers

A female servant punctured the end of the finger by a pin; there
succeeded much pain and swelling, and it appeared that the nail would
separate, and the cuticle all round the finger was raised by the
effusion of fluid. This fluid was evacuated and a poultice applied.

On the third day the cuticle was removed, and the exposed surface was
found to be ulcerated in several spots. The lunar caustic was passed
slightly over the excoriated surface, which was then left exposed to

On the succeeding day the eschar was adherent and the pain had almost
subsided. On the next day, the eschar still remained adherent, and as
there was neither pain nor soreness, the patient used her finger.

The eschar was at length removed by the healing process and was
separated together with the nail, and the case was unattended by any
further inconvenience or trouble either to the patient or myself.

It is scarcely necessary to contrast the advantage of this mode of
treatment with that by plasters, poultices, &c. It is at once more
speedy and secure, and less cumbersome to such patients as are obliged
to continue domestic avocations.

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