The Inward And The Outward Current


Categories: PRINCIPLES OF PRACTICE.
Sources: A Newly Discovered System Of Electrical Medication

I have already said that when the conducting-cords are of equal length,

as for the most part they should be, the central point of the circuit

will be in the person of the patient, about midway between the two

electrodes. Now, since the current always runs from the positive to the

negative pole, and makes its whole circuit in that direction, it will be

readily seen that, from the place on the patient where the positive pole

is applied, inward as far as to the central point, the direction of the

current may properly be said to be inward; and that, from the central

point to the place of the negative electrode, where the current comes

out, its direction may be said to be outward. When, therefore, a part

is treated with the positive pole, or when the part under treatment

appears anywhere between the positive pole and the central point, it is

not unusual to say, It is treated with the inward current. And when a

part is treated with the negative pole, or when it appears between the

central point and the negative pole, it is often spoken of as being

treated with the outward current.





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