Sing. Plural 1st person If I had loved If we had loved 2nd person If you had loved If you had loved 3rd person If he had loved If they had loved ... Read more of PAST PERFECT TENSE at Speaking Writing.comInformational Site Network Informational
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The Lookout Department





Category: THE LOOKOUT DEPARTMENT
Source: A Handbook Of Health

Why the Eyes, Ears, and Nose are Near the Mouth. If you had no eyes,
ears, or nose, you might just as well be dead; and you soon would be, if
you had no one to feed you and guide you about and take care of you.
Naturally, all three of these scouts and spies of the body, which warn
us of danger and guide us to food and shelter, are near the mouth, at
the head-end of the body. The nose by means of which we smell food, to
see whether it is sweet and good or not, is directly above the mouth;
the eyes are above and on each side, like the lamps of an automobile,
but swinging in sockets like search-lights; while the ears are a couple
of inches behind, on each side of us, for catching from the sea of air
the waves that we call sound.

You could almost guess what each of these is for, just by looking at it.
The nose and the ears are open and hollow because air must pass into
them in order to bring us odors or sounds; while the eyes are solid,
somewhat like big glass marbles, to receive light--because light can go
right through anything that is transparent. Eyes, ears, and nose all
began on the surface, and sank gradually into the head, so as to be
surrounded and protected, leaving just opening enough at the surface to
allow smells, light-rays, and sound-waves to enter; and all of them have
at their bottom, or deepest part, a sensitive patch of surface, which
catches the light, or the smells, or the sounds, and sends them by a
special nerve to the brain.

These three sets of organs have gradually and slowly grown into the
shape in which we now find them, in order to do the particular kind of
smelling, seeing, and hearing that will be most useful to us. Every kind
of animal has a slightly different shape and arrangement of eye, of ear,
and of nose to fit his particular business; but in all animals they
are built upon the same simple, general plan.





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