VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.homemedicine.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Catarrh Chronic

If in the head, first give face-bath, as in common colds, exc...

Cholera Morbus

Keep the patient still as possible on his back. Use A D curre...

To Prevent Bilious Fever Or Ague

Take _Podophyllin_, _Baptisia_ and _Gelseminum_ 1st in rotati...

Eyes Cataract On

This disease has been arrested, and in earlier stages even cur...

Medicines

The delusion that health can be restored by swallowing drugs i...

Anomalies Of The Tracheobronchial Tree

Tracheobronchial anomalies are relatively rare. Congenital e...

Kidney Complaints

See Urinary Troubles. ...

Tracheobronchial Diphtheria

Urgent dyspnea in diphtheria when no membrane and but slight...

Gangrene Of The Lung

Pulmonary gangrene has been followed by recovery after the e...

The Relation Of The Principal Bloodvessels Of The Thorax And Abdomen To The Osseous Skeleton Etc

The arterial system of vessels assumes, in all cases, somewha...

Eyes Squinting

Various affections of the eyeball muscles cause this. To cure ...

Actinomycosis Of The Esophagus

Esophageal actinomycosis has been autoptically discovered. It...

Drinks Refreshing

This is a matter of great importance to the sick. Nor is anyth...

Leucorrhoea And Prolapsus Uteri - Whites Female Weakness

The disease depends in all cases upon _inflammation_ of the u...

Diet Economy In

Dr. Hutchison, one of our greatest authorities on the subject ...

Bronchitis

This frequent and severe trouble results most usually from chi...

Want Of Water

One of the obstacles is the _want of a sufficient quantity of...

To Prevent Colds

Keep the _arms_, _hands_ and _chest_ well clothed and warm. ...

Abscess Of The Lung

If of foreign-body origin, pulmonary abscess almost invariab...

Alkalies

Anything which tends to increase the acidity of the tissues a...



Acute Cardiac Symptoms Acute Heart Attack





Category: Uncategorized
Source: Disturbances Of The Heart

It is not proposed here to describe the condition of sudden cardiac
failure, or acute dilatation during disease, or after a severe heart
strain, but to describe the terrible cardiac agony which occurs,
sometimes repeatedly, with many patients who have valvular lesions.
These patients may not have the symptoms of loss of compensation.
Probably some one or more chambers of the heart become overdistended
and act irregularly, or the blood is suddenly dammed up in the
lungs, with the oppression and dyspnea caused by such passive
congestion, or perhaps it is the right ventricle that is suddenly in
serious trouble.

A physician receives an emergency call, and knows, if it is not a
patient who has hysteria, that it is his duty to see the patient
immediately. The friends of the patient all anxiously await the
physician's arrival; front doors are often wide open, and the
servants and the whole household are in a great state of excitement
and anxiety. The position in which the patient will be found is that
which he has learned gives him the greatest comfort. If the
physician knows his patient, he will know how he will find him. He
may lie sitting up in bed; he may be standing, leaning over a chair;
he may be sitting in a chair leaning over a table or leaning over
the back of another chair; but he is using every auxiliary muscle he
possesses to respire. He is generally bathed in cold perspiration;
the extremities are often icy cold; he calls for air, and to stop
fanning all in one breath; he wishes the perspiration wiped off his
brow, and nearly goes frantic while it is being done; there is agony
depicted on his face; his eyes stare; his expirations are often
groaning. Sometimes there is even incontinence of urine and feces,
often hiccup or short coughs, perhaps vomiting, and possibly sharp
pangs of pain in the cardiac region. A patient with these symptoms
may die at any moment, and the wonder is that so many times one
lives through these paroxysms.

The patient can hardly be questioned, can certainly not be carefully
examined; and herein lies the advantage of the family physician who
knows the patient and his heart, and in whom the patient has
confidence.

In fact, this confidence which such a patient has in the physician
who has more or less frequently aided him in weathering these
terrible attacks is alone the greatest boon the patient can have.





Next: Paroxysm Management

Previous: Pulmonary Stenosis Pulmonary Obstruction



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1268