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Squeezing

See Rubbing. ...

The Relations Of The Principal Bloodvessels To The Viscera Of The Thoracico-abdominal Cavity

The median line of the body is occupied by the centres of the...

Dripping Sheet Substitute For The Half-bath

To apply the _dripping sheet_, a tin bathing hat or a large w...

Wounds Soothing

During the process of healing, wounds often give a great deal ...

Sciatica

This is a severe pain in the lower back, shooting sharply down...

Wounds And Bruises

On this subject, I must necessarily be very brief. When a wou...

Mind In Disease

Often a person, because of physical failure, becomes possessed...

Decline

See Consumption. ...

Additional Rules For The Treatment Of Eruptive Diseases

In all these eruptive diseases, especially small-pox, all I h...

Delirium In Fever

The best way of treating this truly distressing symptom is by ...

Signs Of Heart Weakness

It should be remembered that a normal heart may slow to about...

Pimples On The Face

See Face. ...

Scarlatina Simplex Or Simple Scarlet-fever

In the _mildest form_ of the disease, called _scarlatina simp...

Rheumatism

We feel urged, in first considering this sore and very common ...

Acetic Acid

is a most efficient remedy applied to old irritable _varicose...

Symptoms Of Gastric Foreign Body

Foreign body in the stomach ordinarily produces no symptoms. ...

The Effort Of Digestion

Digestion is a huge, unappreciated task, unappreciated becaus...

Foreign Bodies In The Insane

Foreign bodies may be introduced voluntarily and in great nu...

Why People Get Sick

This is the Theory of Toxemia. A healthy body struggles conti...

Dyspepsia

See Indigestion. ...



Acute Cardiac Symptoms Acute Heart Attack





Category: Uncategorized
Source: Disturbances Of The Heart

It is not proposed here to describe the condition of sudden cardiac
failure, or acute dilatation during disease, or after a severe heart
strain, but to describe the terrible cardiac agony which occurs,
sometimes repeatedly, with many patients who have valvular lesions.
These patients may not have the symptoms of loss of compensation.
Probably some one or more chambers of the heart become overdistended
and act irregularly, or the blood is suddenly dammed up in the
lungs, with the oppression and dyspnea caused by such passive
congestion, or perhaps it is the right ventricle that is suddenly in
serious trouble.

A physician receives an emergency call, and knows, if it is not a
patient who has hysteria, that it is his duty to see the patient
immediately. The friends of the patient all anxiously await the
physician's arrival; front doors are often wide open, and the
servants and the whole household are in a great state of excitement
and anxiety. The position in which the patient will be found is that
which he has learned gives him the greatest comfort. If the
physician knows his patient, he will know how he will find him. He
may lie sitting up in bed; he may be standing, leaning over a chair;
he may be sitting in a chair leaning over a table or leaning over
the back of another chair; but he is using every auxiliary muscle he
possesses to respire. He is generally bathed in cold perspiration;
the extremities are often icy cold; he calls for air, and to stop
fanning all in one breath; he wishes the perspiration wiped off his
brow, and nearly goes frantic while it is being done; there is agony
depicted on his face; his eyes stare; his expirations are often
groaning. Sometimes there is even incontinence of urine and feces,
often hiccup or short coughs, perhaps vomiting, and possibly sharp
pangs of pain in the cardiac region. A patient with these symptoms
may die at any moment, and the wonder is that so many times one
lives through these paroxysms.

The patient can hardly be questioned, can certainly not be carefully
examined; and herein lies the advantage of the family physician who
knows the patient and his heart, and in whom the patient has
confidence.

In fact, this confidence which such a patient has in the physician
who has more or less frequently aided him in weathering these
terrible attacks is alone the greatest boon the patient can have.





Next: Paroxysm Management

Previous: Pulmonary Stenosis Pulmonary Obstruction



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