Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Poultice Bran

See Bran Poultice. ...

Pathology

If the foreign body completely obstructs a main bronchus, pr...

Hypotension

A low systolic pressure and a low diastolic pressure may no...

Taking A Laryngeal Specimen For Diagnosis

The diagnosis of carcinoma, sarcoma, and some other conditio...

Infants' Sleep

See Children's Sleep. ...

Children's Strength

The question often arises as to the ability of children to bea...

There Is Neither A Specific Nor A Prophylactic To Be Relied On

All these different methods and remedies, and many others, ha...

Cornus Sericea

will often cure malignant ulcers both of the breast and uteru...

1 Is Water Applicable In All Typhoid Cases?

The question has been raised, whether in typhoid cases, and i...

Nourishment Heat In

Heat is absorbed in building up the bodily tissues, and given ...

Children's Deformed Feet

See Club Foot. ...

Chronic Back Pain

Barry was a carpenter who couldn't afford to lose work becaus...

Troubles Of The Nervous System

The Nervous System is not easily Damaged. The nervous system ...

How Fasting Heals

Its an old hygienic maxim that the doctor does not heal, the ...

Pleurisy

The pleura is the tender double web, or membrane, which lines ...

Children's Limbs

Frequently a failure of some kind shows itself in the limbs of...

Eyes Danger To Sight Of

Where inflammation has gone so far as to lead to suppuration, ...

Old Ulcers

Take the A D current. If torpid, treat with mild force. Treat...

Hooping Cough

See Whooping Cough. ...

Tuberculosis Of The Esophagus

Esophageal tuberculosis is not commonly met, but is probably ...



Rupture And Trauma Of The Esophagus





Category: DISEASES OF THE ESOPHAGUS
Source: A Manual Of Peroral Endoscopy And Laryngeal Surgery

These may be spontaneous or may ensue from the passage of an
instrument, or foreign body, or of both combined, as exemplified in
the blind attempts to remove a foreign body or to push it downwards.
Digestion of the esophagus and perforation may result from the
stagnation of regurgitated gastric juice therein. This condition
sometimes occurs in profound toxic and debilitated states. Rupture of
the thoracic esophagus produces profound shock, fever, mediastinal
emphysema, and rapid sinking. Pneumothorax and empyema follow
perforation into the pleural cavity. Rupture of the cervical esophagus
is usually followed by cervical emphysema and cervical abscess, both
of which often burrow into the mediastinum along the fascial layers of
the neck. Lesser degrees of trauma produce esophagitis usually
accompanied by fever and painful and difficult swallowing.

The treatment of traumatic esophagitis consists in rest in bed,
sterile liquid food, and the administration of bismuth subnitrate
(about one gramme in an adult), dry on the tongue every 4 hours.
Rupture of the esophagus requires immediate gastrostomy to put the
esophagus at rest and supply necessary alimentation. Thoracotomy for
drainage is required when the pleural cavity has been involved, not
only for pleural secretions, but for the constant and copious
esophageal leakage. It is not ordinarily realized how much normal
salivary drainage passes down the esophagus. The customary treatment
of shock is to be applied. No attempt should be made to remove a
foreign body until the traumatic lesions have healed. This may require
a number of weeks. Decision as to when to remove the intruder is
determined by esophagoscopic inspection.

Subcutaneous emphysema does not require puncture unless gaseous, or
unless pus forms. In the latter event free external drainage becomes
imperative.





Next: Acute Esophagitis

Previous: Anomalies Of The Esophagus



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 845