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Tucker Forceps





Category: INSTRUMENTARIUM
Source: A Manual Of Peroral Endoscopy And Laryngeal Surgery

Gabriel Tucker modified the regular side-curved
forceps by adding a lip (Fig. 21) to the left hand side of both upper
and lower jaws. This prevents the shaft of a tack, nail, or pin, from
springing out of the grasp of the jaws, and is so efficient that it
has brought certainty of grasp never before obtainable. With it the
solution of the safety-pin problem devised by the author many years
ago has a facility and certainty of execution that makes it the method
of choice in safety-pin extraction.

[FIG. 22.--The author's down-jaw esophageal forceps. The dropping jaw
is useful for reaching backward below the cricopharyngeal fold when
using the esophageal speculum in the removal of foreign bodies.
Posterior forceps-spaces are often scanty in cases of foreign bodies
lodged just below the cricopharyngeus.]

[FIG. 23.--Expansile forceps for the endoscopic removal of hollow
foreign bodies such as intubation tubes, tracheal cannulae, caps, and
cartridge shells.]

Screw forceps.--For the secure grasp of screws the jaws devised by
Dr. Tucker for tacks and pins are excellent (Fig. 21).

Expanding Forceps.--Hollow objects may require expanding
forceps as shown in Fig. 23. In using them it is necessary to be
certain that the jaws are inside the hollow body before expanding them
and making traction. Otherwise severe, even fatal, trauma may be
inflicted.

[FIG. 24.--The author's fenestrated peanut forceps. The delicate
construction with long, springy and fenestrated jaws give in gentle
hands a maximum security with a minimum of crushing tendency.]

[FIG. 25--The author's bronchial dilators, useful for dilating
strictures above foreign bodies. The smaller size, shown at the right
is also useful as an expanding forceps for removing intubation tubes,
and other hollow objects. The larger size will go over the shaft of a
tack.]

[FIG. 26.--The author's self-expanding bronchial dilator. The extent of
expansion can be limited by the sense of touch or by an adjustable
checking mechanism on the handle. The author frequently used smooth
forceps for this purpose, and found them so efficient that this
dilator was devised. The edges of forceps jaws are likely to scratch
the epithelium. Occasionally the instrument is useful in the
esophagus; but it is not very safe, unless used with the utmost
caution.]





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