Joseph Jacobs There was once upon a time a poor widow who had an only son named Jack, and a cow named Milky-white. And all they had to live on was the milk the cow gave every morning, which they carried to the market and sold. But one m... Read more of JACK AND THE BEANSTALK at Children Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational


Medical Articles

Mother's Remedies

Household Tips

Medicine History

Forgotten Remedies


Medical Articles

About Christmas

THERE was once a family who had a guest staying with ...

Angina Pectoris Symptoms

The pain of true angina pectoris generally starts in the regi...

Other Kinds Of Cancer

There seem to be many other kinds of cancer, at least if you ...

To Prevent Cholera

_Camphor_ (_pellets medicated_ with the pure tincture) _Verat...


See Digestion; Nourishment. ...

Nerve Shock

After a fright, or some very trying experience, some part of t...

Treatment Of Endocarditis

As mild endocarditis rarely occurs primarily but is almost al...

The Surgical Dissection Of The Superficial Bloodvessels Etc Of The Inguino-femoral Region

Hernial protrusions are very liable to occur at the inguino-f...

Pulmonary Stenosis Pulmonary Obstruction

If stenosis is actually present in this location, the lesion ...


Digestion is the process whereby the food we eat is turned int...


is applied to wounds, _incised_ and _lacerated_, promoting he...

Nervous Prostration

Persons suffering from nervous prostration have probably allow...


Lumbago differs from both paralysis and cramp of the lower bac...


It has been estimated that 70 per cent of stenoses of the es...

Feet Giving Way

Where there is a great deal of standing to be done by any one,...

Headache Sick

The stomach and head affect each other powerfully, and a disor...

Croup Less Serious Form

The less serious croup proceeds from a nervous closing of the ...


Readily identified by smell of tar or carbolic. Wash mouth wel...

Plate Iv

A, Gastroscopic view of a gastrojejunostomy opening drawn pat...

Baths For Head

In many cases of indigestion and brain exhaustion head-baths a...


Source: Primitive Psycho-therapy And Quackery

JEROME CARDAN, an Italian physician, author, mathematician and
philosopher, was born at Pavia, September 24, 1501. He was the
illegitimate son of Facio Cardan, a man of repute among the learned in
his neighborhood, from whom Jerome received instruction in his youth.
Although idolized by his mother, he incurred his father's dislike, and
these circumstances, we are told, exerted a peculiar influence upon his
character. Despite many difficulties, however, he achieved both fame and
notoriety. After having received degrees in arts and medicine from the
University of Padua, he became Professor of Mathematics at Milan in
1534, and later was admitted to the College of Physicians in that city.
In 1547 he declined an invitation to become court physician at
Copenhagen, on account of the harsh northern climate and the obligation
to change his religion. In the year 1552 Jerome Cardan visited Scotland
at the request of John Hamilton, Archbishop of St. Andrews, whom he
treated for asthma with success. Thence he was summoned to England to
give his professional advice in the case of Edward VI, after which he
returned to Milan with enhanced prestige. He afterwards practised
Medicine at Pavia and Bologna and finally settled at Rome, where he
received a pension from the Pope. His death occurred there, September
21, 1575.

Cardan was possessed of great natural ability, and for a time was
regarded as the most eminent physician and astrologer among his
contemporaries. But his mind was of a peculiar cast, and his temper most
inconstant. He had, says Peter Bayle, in his "Historical Dictionary," a
decided love of paradox, and of the marvellous, an infantine credulity,
a superstition scarce conceivable, an insupportable vanity, and a
boasting that knew no limits. His works, though full of puerilities and
contradictions, of absurd tales and charlatanry of every description,
nevertheless offer proofs of a bold, inventive genius, which seeks for
new paths of science, and succeeds in finding them. According to his own
statement, he found pleasure in roaming about the streets all night
long. His love of gaming amounted to a mania. Baron von Leibnitz
(1646-1716) wrote of Cardan, that notwithstanding his faults, he was a
great man, and without his defects, would have been incomparable. He
wrote extensively on philosophy, mathematics, and medicine, and also on
chiromancy. For his own follies and misfortunes he apologized,
attributing them all to the influence of the stars. He has been
described as a genuine philosopher and devotee of science, and his
lasting reputation is chiefly due to his discoveries in algebra, in
which art, wrote the historian, Henry Hallam, he made a great epoch.

Next: Balsamo

Previous: Agrippa

Add to Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network

Viewed 931