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Diet





Category: TREATMENT OF SCARLET-FEVER.
Source: Hydriatic Treatment Of Scarlet Fever In Its Different Forms

I have little to say with regard to _diet_, at least to physicians.
During great heat and high fever, the patient should eat little or
nothing; but he should drink a good deal. Substantial food must be
avoided entirely. When the fever abates, he can take more nourishment,
but it should be light. Meat and soup should only be given, when
desquamation has fairly begun. Stewed fruit (especially dried apples)
will be very agreeable to the patient. In great heat, a glass of
lemonade may be given occasionally; however, great care must be taken
not to spoil the patient's taste by sweets, or to allow him all sorts of
dainties, such as candies, preserves, &c., as it is the habit of weak
parents, who like to gratify their darlings' momentary desires at the
expense of their future welfare. In torpid cases, some beef-tea,
chicken-broth, and even a little wine with water, will raise the
reactive powers of the patient. During convalescence, meat may be
permitted to such patients as have been accustomed to eat it, and, in
general, the patients may be allowed to gradually resume their former
diet (provided it were a healthy one), with some restriction in regard
to quantity. In general, under water-treatment, the digestive organs
continuing in a tolerably good state, and the functions in better order,
we need not be quite so careful with respect to diet, as if the patient
were left to himself, or treated after any other method of the
drug-system. Let the food be plain, and the patient will scarcely ever
eat too much. To stimulate his appetite by constantly asking him whether
he would not like this or that, is sheer nonsense; and to satisfy his
whims, against our better conviction, is culpable weakness.

From this general outline, I shall now pass to the treatment adapted to
the different forms of scarlatina.





Next: Treatment Of Scarlatina Simplex Or Simple Scarlet-fever

Previous: Water-drinking



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