Military - Download the EBook Sea OperationsInformational Site Network Informational


Medical Articles

Mother's Remedies

Household Tips

Medicine History

Forgotten Remedies


Medical Articles

Limbs Disjointed Or Sprained

In the case of an overstretch, or sprain, which has resulted i...

A Healthy Colon

From my point of view the most amazing part of this whole exp...

Climate And Soil

The soil on which one lives is a matter of primary importance;...

White Leg

When a limb becomes swelled and white, pouring hot water very ...

A Rampaging Infection

At the age of 40, John, an old bohemian client of mine, came ...

Malignant Endocarditis Ulcerative Endocarditis

Since we have learned that bacteria are probably at the botto...

Ulceration Of The Esophagus

Superficial erosions of the esophagus are by no means an unco...

Tartar Emetic Or Other Antimonial Poisons

If vomiting is not present, induce it by an emetic. Give doses...

Blood Poisoning

(See Blood, Purifying; Sores). ...

Glands Of Bowels

See Bowels. ...

Mineral Acids Muriatic Acid Prescriptions

have also been used with good effect in some epidemics. _Muri...

The Resort Treatment Of Chronic Heart Disease

In line with the continued growing popularity of special reso...

Limbs Uncontrollable

This trouble is found in the double form; first, of limbs whic...

Blood Supply Of

To supply good blood in cases where it is lacking, either from...

Inflammation Of The Finger Case Xxxii

Miss B. aged 23, had a slight scratch on the inside of the in...

Affection Of The Brain

When the _brain_ is affected, the patient suddenly complains ...

Philosophy Of Disease And Cure

In every part of the animal economy, polar derangements in th...

Varix And Angioma Of The Esophagus

These lesions are sometimes the cause of esophageal hemorrhag...

Inspection Of The Party Wall In Cases Of Suspected Laryngeal Malignancy

When taking a specimen the party wall should be inspected by...

Nostrils The

The disease called Polypus, affecting the mouth or nostril wit...

Malignant Endocarditis Ulcerative Endocarditis

Category: Uncategorized
Source: Disturbances Of The Heart

Since we have learned that bacteria are probably at the bottom of
almost any endocarditis, the terms suggested under the
classification of endocarditis as "mild" and "malignant" really
represent a better understanding of this disease. They are not
separate entities, and a mild endocarditis may become an ulcerative
endocarditis with malignant symptoms. On the other hand, malignant
endocarditis may apparently develop de novo. Still, if the cause is
carefully sought there will generally be found a source of
infection, a septic process somewhere, possibly a gonorrhea, a
septic tonsil or even a pyorrhea alveolaris. Septic uterine
disturbances have long been known to be a source of this disease.
Meningitis, pneumonia, diphtheria, typhoid fever and rarely
rheumatism may all cause this severe form of endocarditis.

Ulcerative endocarditis was first described by Kirkes in 1851, was
later shown to be a distinctive type of endocarditis by Charcot and
Virchow, and finally was thoroughly described by Osler in 1885.

Ulcerative endocarditis was for a long time believed to be
inevitably fatal; it is now known that a small proportion of
patients with this disease recover. Children occasionally suffer
from it, but it is generally a disease of middle adult life. Chorea
may bear an apparent causal relation to it in rare instances.

Ulcerative endocarditis may develop on a mild endocarditis, with
disintegration of tissue and deep points of erosion, and there may
be little pockets of pus or little abscesses in the muscle tissue.
If such a process advances far, of course the prognosis is
absolutely dire. If the ulcerations, though formed, soon begin to
heal, especially in rheumatism, the prognosis may be good, as far as
the immediate future is concerned. If the process becomes septic, or
if there is a serious septic reason for the endocarditis, the
outlook is hopeless. This form of endocarditis is generally
accompanied by a bacteremia, and the causative germs may be
recovered from the blood. One of the most frequent is the
Streptococcus viridans.

Next: Diagnosis

Previous: Prognosis And Convalescence

Add to Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network

Viewed 1142