VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.homemedicine.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Colds Consumption And Pneumonia

Disease Germs. In all foul air there are scores of different ...

From The Hygienic Dictionary 2

Toxemia. [1] "Toxemia is the basic cause of all so-called dise...

The Dissection Of Femoral Hernia And The Seat Of Stricture

Whilst all forms of inguinal herniae escape from the abdomen ...

The Care Of An Invalid

TO take really good care of one who is ill requires n...

Diphtheria

Use the A D current, strong force. Place the N. P., long cord...

Where There Is A Will There Is A Way!

I have been frequently compelled to resort to these milder ap...

Less-rigorous-than-water Fasts

There are gradations of fasting measures ranging from rigorou...

Legs Pricking Pains In

Sometimes curious pricking pains are felt in the legs, becomin...

Mouth-gag

Wide gagging prevents proper exposure of the larynx by forci...

Nourishment Heat In

Heat is absorbed in building up the bodily tissues, and given ...

Edematous Tracheobronchitis

This is chiefly observed in children. The most frequently en...

Measles

_Measles_, which may be easily distinguished from scarlatina,...

Methods Of Obtaining Pure Water

Wise Planning and Spending of Money is Necessary. If our city...

Our Feet

The Living Arches of the Foot. One of the most important thin...

Nerves Shaken

By this we mean, not the nerve trouble which follows a sudden ...

Coronary Sclerosis

While disease of the coronary arteries may occur without ge...

Roentgenray Study In Foreign Body Cases

Roentgenography.--All cases of chest disease should have the ...

Fall A

After a fall from a height, where there is no apparent outward...

Human Sympathy

A NURSE who had been only a few weeks in the hospital...

Children's Teething

See Teething. ...



Wounds Bleeding Of






Source: Papers On Health

After sending for a surgeon the first thing to be
looked at in case of any wound is the bleeding. Sometimes this is
trifling and needs no particular effort to staunch it. When, however, a
vein or artery has been lacerated the flow must immediately be attended
to.

If the blood be welling up from the wound and of a dark red colour it
is venous blood, if it spurt up from the wound and be of a bright red
colour it is arterial blood. What has to be done is to place a pressure
on the vein or artery to prevent the blood escaping.

Venous bleeding may generally be stopped by putting a pad of lint
dipped in cold water on the wound and tying it on with a bandage. If
the blood continues to flow, tie a bandage round the limb on the side
of the wound away from the heart and keep the limb raised.

Arterial bleeding must be treated by tying on the pad and bandage, and
if the bleeding continues, stopping the flow in the artery on the side
of the wound nearest the heart, and at some point where it passes
over a bone so that pressure may be efficiently applied. The bandage
for thus tying an artery may be simply made by knotting a handkerchief
(Diagram IV.), putting something solid inside the knot, then placing
the knot on the artery at the desired point and tying tightly. If
required this may be tightened by putting a stick under and twisting
round, then tying the stick in position (Diagram II.).

If the palm of the hand is cut, put a pad inside the hand, close the
fingers, and tie the bandage round the clenched fist.

If the wound is in the forearm, put a pad in the bend of the elbow, and
tie the forearm firmly up on the arm. If the wound is above the elbow
stop the main artery in the way above indicated. This artery runs
pretty well under the inner seam of the sleeve of a man's coat. Diagram
I. shows how this artery may be stopped by direct pressure of the hand;
Diagram II. how a tourniquet may be applied.

For bleeding in the arm-pit, press in a pad and tie the arm down to the
side. It may be necessary here to compress the artery with the thumb.
The artery here lies behind the inner bend of the collar bone lying on
the first rib.

In case of arterial bleeding about the head apply the bandage as in
Diagram III. The pressure is here applied right over the wound, as the
skull is always behind on which to press the artery.

A wound in the leg should be treated in a similar way to a wound in the
arm. Diagram V. shows the stopping of bleeding above the knee.

Do not remove the pressure until the arrival of a medical man.





Next: Wounds Ill-smelling

Previous: Worry



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 919