VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.homemedicine.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Length Of Bath

Although the temperature, in sthenic cases, should be a littl...

Pulse Testing For Allergies

Coca's Pulse Tests are extraordinarily useful and simple tool...

Sunshine

Is a most valuable aid to health, acting as a physical and men...

Fright

Some most distressing troubles come as the result of frights. ...

Drowning

Many valuable lives have been saved by an elementary knowledge...

Inward Rotation Method

When the point is found to be buried in the mucosa, the best...

Care Of The Nails

Importance of Clean Nails. On account of their constant use, ...

Ears Singing In The

Partial deafness is often accompanied by noises in the ear, wh...

The Brain In Its Direction Of The Body

WE come now to the brain and its direction of other p...

Diagnosis

If a more malignant form of endocarditis develops on a mild ...

How To Sew Easily

IT is a common saying that we should let our heads sa...

Hair Coming Off

There are many forms of this disfiguring trouble, both in the ...

Worms

It is difficult to determine the presence of _worms_ in child...

Balance Loss Of

Cases where loss of balance in walking and standing are due to...

Nicotine (tobacco)

Emetic; stimulate and keep warm; keep patient lying down. ...

Pimples On The Face

See Face. ...

Social/cultural/psychological Obstacles To Fasting

Numerous attitudes make it difficult to fast or to provide mo...

Vital Forces Animal And Vegetable

Upon these points I must be permitted to offer a few words. ...

Pleurisy

The pleura is the tender double web, or membrane, which lines ...

Healing

For healing wounds, burns, ulcers, irritation of mucous membr...



Wounds Bleeding Of






Source: Papers On Health

After sending for a surgeon the first thing to be
looked at in case of any wound is the bleeding. Sometimes this is
trifling and needs no particular effort to staunch it. When, however, a
vein or artery has been lacerated the flow must immediately be attended
to.

If the blood be welling up from the wound and of a dark red colour it
is venous blood, if it spurt up from the wound and be of a bright red
colour it is arterial blood. What has to be done is to place a pressure
on the vein or artery to prevent the blood escaping.

Venous bleeding may generally be stopped by putting a pad of lint
dipped in cold water on the wound and tying it on with a bandage. If
the blood continues to flow, tie a bandage round the limb on the side
of the wound away from the heart and keep the limb raised.

Arterial bleeding must be treated by tying on the pad and bandage, and
if the bleeding continues, stopping the flow in the artery on the side
of the wound nearest the heart, and at some point where it passes
over a bone so that pressure may be efficiently applied. The bandage
for thus tying an artery may be simply made by knotting a handkerchief
(Diagram IV.), putting something solid inside the knot, then placing
the knot on the artery at the desired point and tying tightly. If
required this may be tightened by putting a stick under and twisting
round, then tying the stick in position (Diagram II.).

If the palm of the hand is cut, put a pad inside the hand, close the
fingers, and tie the bandage round the clenched fist.

If the wound is in the forearm, put a pad in the bend of the elbow, and
tie the forearm firmly up on the arm. If the wound is above the elbow
stop the main artery in the way above indicated. This artery runs
pretty well under the inner seam of the sleeve of a man's coat. Diagram
I. shows how this artery may be stopped by direct pressure of the hand;
Diagram II. how a tourniquet may be applied.

For bleeding in the arm-pit, press in a pad and tie the arm down to the
side. It may be necessary here to compress the artery with the thumb.
The artery here lies behind the inner bend of the collar bone lying on
the first rib.

In case of arterial bleeding about the head apply the bandage as in
Diagram III. The pressure is here applied right over the wound, as the
skull is always behind on which to press the artery.

A wound in the leg should be treated in a similar way to a wound in the
arm. Diagram V. shows the stopping of bleeding above the knee.

Do not remove the pressure until the arrival of a medical man.





Next: Wounds Ill-smelling

Previous: Worry



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 826