Throat Sore (clergyman's)


Sources: Papers On Health

Those who are in the habit of using their

voice much should be very careful to produce it in the proper way. It

is noticeable that actors (who learn to produce their voice properly)

do not suffer from what is known as clergyman's sore throat.



The voice in speaking should be pitched, as a rule, considerably lower

than is usually done, especially if speaking in public. Any tightening

of the throat muscles should be avoided, and the voice sent out from a

full chest well expanded.



Those who are musical should take a note on the piano enunciating the

vowels in their natural order ([=a], ay, ee, o, oo) on this note. Then

proceed to the next note; the whole of the octave may thus be gone

over. Choose an octave most consonant with the range of the voice.



Then add the consonants: b[=a], bay, bee, c[=a], cay, etc., etc. Thus a

perfect command over all the possible combinations of vowels and

consonants may be attained.



There is absolutely no reason why any musical person should have an

unmusical voice, especially since this bad production of the voice

often strains the muscles and inflames the mucous membrane of the

throat. In connection with this question of music, it should be

remembered that almost irretrievable injury to the voice may be done by

allowing a boy to continue singing after his voice has begun to

"break."



It is not a good plan to be constantly "clearing" the throat whilst

speaking. One gets to imagine after a while that it needs clearing when

it really does not.



Alcohol and tobacco are both undoubtedly injurious to the voice. A

little honey and lemon juice will be found the best gargle if a gargle

is required.



Deep breathing is of great assistance in endeavouring to produce the

lower note, in fact it is not possible to produce a full note except

from a full chest. In this connection it may be said that it has been

observed that deep-chested, deep-breathing, slow-speaking people are

frequently possessed of certain estimable points of character, such as

prudence, firmness, self-reliance, calmness. If one is going to be

angry, ten deep breaths might save a world of trouble. (See

Breathing, Correct method of).





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