In the same way, in August, 1890, a lady in a Boston hotel in the dusk rang for the lift, walked along the corridor and looked out of a window, started to run to the door of the lift, saw a man in front of it, stopped, and when the lighted lift... Read more of The Man At The Lift at Scary Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy


Home


Medical Articles


Mother's Remedies


Household Tips


Medicine History


Forgotten Remedies


Search

Medical Articles

Roentgenray Study In Foreign Body Cases

Roentgenography.--All cases of chest disease should have the ...

Treatment

In this rapid high tension age the physician should be as ene...

Scrofula

The treatment under Glands, Swollen, should be followed. But b...

Home Methods Of Purifying Water

Boiling. Where the water that you are obliged to drink is not...

The Electric Circuit

The Electric Circuit is made up of any thing and every thing ...

Throat Sore (clergyman's)

Those who are in the habit of using their voice much should be...

Treatment Of Acute And Subacute Inflammation And Ulceration Of The Esophagus

Bismuth subnitrate in doses of about one gramme, given dry o...

Safety-pin Closer

There are a number of methods for the endoscopic removal of ...

Tracheobronchial Diphtheria

Urgent dyspnea in diphtheria when no membrane and but slight...

Varioloid

is small pox modified by vaccination. It is to be treated as ...

There Is Neither A Specific Nor A Prophylactic To Be Relied On

All these different methods and remedies, and many others, ha...

Strychnine

Emetic; keep quiet and darken the room. Chloral or bromide of ...

The Poor Start

For this reason it makes sense to take vitamins and food sup...

Breath And Blood

Often difficulty of breathing, especially in close air, mistak...

Restlessness

In slight cases, where the patient simply cannot sleep for tos...

Fainting

Fatigue, excessive heat, fright, loss of blood, hunger, etc., ...

Preventative Fasting

During the years it takes for a body to degenerate enough to ...

Anchoring The Foreign Body Against The Tube Mouth

If withdrawal be made a bimanual procedure it is almost cert...

Nostrils The

The disease called Polypus, affecting the mouth or nostril wit...

Inflamed Eyes

If the disease be recent and acute, (but not infectious), as ...



Noise And Disease






Source: Papers On Health

Perhaps nothing shows more the lack of human
feeling in many people than the manner in which they inflict sore
distress on the sick and dying by means of noise. Moreover, recovery is
retarded, and has sometimes been wholly prevented, by nothing but a
noise. It must be understood that talking, and also singing, which
are delightful to some, become intolerable pain to the delicate and
weak. They really are worn out by them. And the wearing out is
real: it is a destruction of nerve substance, when the nerve of the
patient is already too feeble. Shutting doors violently, and the
endless "house noises," must be avoided. Even a long, loud prayer at
the bedside of the sick is utterly out of place. It may become
necessary, in order to prevent such abuses, to exclude from the
sick-room some who will be greatly offended thereby; but courage to
defend a patient against well-meaning intruders is one essential
qualification of a good nurse. Oil doors that squeak, fasten windows
that rattle, but above all keep quiet the tongues that clatter. Let
all whispering in the sick one's hearing be avoided. Speak quietly but
distinctly, so that the patient may not think you are hiding anything
from him. Wrap the coals in pieces of paper, so that they can be put on
the fire by hand, avoiding the noise of shovel or tongs.

No one has a right to do what distresses others, and especially when
they are sick. This principle should guide action. Acting thus will
give untold rest and ease to the troubled.





Next: Nostrils The

Previous: Night Sweats



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 839